Monday, 30 March 2015

CHOOSING YOUR PETS NAME

My dogs names


                              NEWLA
                               RAYNER


                               HAGRID

CHOOSING YOUR PETS NAME
check out this link

http://www.petplace.com/article/dogs/selecting-a-dog/naming-your-dog/top-1200-pet-names

                            

Snoutstik


A snoutstik is a product like chapstik but for dog’s noses. Newla our Border collie gets a chapped nose in the winter from snuffing under the snow. Great for spring snuffing too! This product comes in three different formulas.

ROSEMARY FOR SOOTHING INFLAMMATION

A natural disinfectant; soothes and reduces inflammation and treats bacterial and fungal infections.

LAVENDER FOR GENTLE NOSE CARE

A clean, fresh scent and calming, balancing properties; provides ultra-gentle skin care and can be applied to irritated, itchy spots as a healing aid.

PUMPKIN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE

Used to treat burns and wounds; heals environmentally damaged and sensitive skin; high in Vitamin A (restores healthy skin tissue) and C (antioxidants protect skin from free radicals).

Did you know that a dog’s nose is at least a million times more sensitive than our own? Imagine how painful a dry or irritated dog nose can be.

Breeds like bulldogs, pugs, mastiffs, and Boston terriers are genetically prone to dry noses, and 50% of all older dogs suffer from dry dog noses.

We created snoutstik® to help alleviate dry dog noses caused by exposure to the elements, allergies or heredity, but any dog’s nose will find relief with snoutstik®’s core combination of healing, natural sunscreens, Shea Butter, Sweet Almond Oil and Jojoba Seed Oil.
TRY IT

Sunday, 29 March 2015

9 Drugs That Top the List of Dangerous Human Medications for Pets

By Dr. Becker
Every year, tens of thousands of pet guardians call animal poison control centers or their veterinarians concerned that their dog or cat has swallowed a toxic substance.
While most conscientious pet owners are aware of poisons and other potential hazards around the home, many don’t realize that several very common over-the-counter and prescription human medications can spell disaster for a beloved pet.

9 Drugs That Top the List of Dangerous Human Medications for Pets

  1. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Topping the list of human medications that can get into the mouths of pets are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs. Brand names include Advil, Motrin, and Aleve.
  2. Your pet is extremely sensitive to compounds in these medications and can become very ill from even a very small dose. Cats can suffer kidney and liver damage, and any pet that ingests NSAIDs can develop ulcers of the digestive tract.
    Symptoms of poisoning include digestive upset, vomiting, bloody stool, increased thirst, increased frequency of urination, staggering, and seizures.
  3. Acetaminophen. Next on the list is another anti-inflammatory called acetaminophen, the most well known of which is Tylenol. Other drugs, including certain types of Excedrin and several sinus and cold preparations, also contain acetaminophen.
  4. Cats are at particular risk from acetaminophen, as just two extra-strength tablets can be fatal. If your dog ingests acetaminophen, permanent liver damage can be the result. And the higher the dose, the more likely that red blood cell damage will occur.

    Symptoms of acetaminophen poisoning are lethargy, trouble breathing, dark-colored urine, diarrhea, and vomiting.

  5. Pseudoephedrine. Number three is pseudoephedrine. Pseudoephedrine is a decongestant compound found in a wide range of cold and sinus medications. Many of these preparations contain acetaminophen as well.
  6. Pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine, another decongestant, are highly toxic to pets. A tablet containing just 30 milligrams of pseudoephedrine can cause a small dog to show clinical signs of toxicity, and just three tablets can be fatal.
  7. Antidepressants. If your dog or cat ingests an antidepressant, symptoms can include listlessness, vomiting, and in some cases, a condition known as serotonin syndrome. This condition can cause agitation, disorientation, and an elevated heart rate, along with elevated blood pressure and body temperature, tremors, and seizures.
  8. The drugs Cymbalta and Effexor topped the list of antidepressant pet poisonings in 2013. For some reason, kitties are drawn to these medications, which can cause severe neurologic and cardiac side effects. Other common brand names of antidepressants are Prozac and Lexapro.
  9. Drugs to treat diabetes. If you or a family member takes an oral medication for diabetes, including glipizide and glyburide, you’ll want to make sure to keep these medications out of your pet’s reach. Diabetes drugs can cause a dangerous drop in your pet’s blood sugar levels, which can result in disorientation, lack of coordination, and seizures.
  10. ADD and ADHD drugs. Prescription attention deficit disorder (ADD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drugs are amphetamines and are very dangerous for pets. Ingesting even minimal amounts of these medications can cause life-threatening tremors, seizures, elevated body temperature, and heart problems. Common brand names include Concerta, Adderall, and Ritalin.
  11. Vitamin D derivatives. Vitamin D derivatives like calcitriol and calcipotriene  are used to treat a wide range of human conditions, including psoriasis, thyroid problems, and osteoporosis.
  12. These compounds can be rapidly fatal if ingested by your dog or cat because they cause blood calcium level spikes. Signs of toxicosis include loss of appetite, vomiting, increased urination, and excessive thirst due to kidney failure.
  13. Beta-blockers. Even taken in very small quantities, beta-blockers used to treat high blood pressure can cause serious problems for pets. Overdoses can trigger life-threatening decreases in blood pressure and a very slow heart rate.
  14. Benzodiazepines and sleep aids. Benzodiazepines and sleep aids with brand names like Xanax, Klonopin, Ambien, and Lunesta, are designed to reduce anxiety and help people sleep better. However, in pets, they sometimes have the opposite effect.
  15. About half the dogs who ingest sleep aids become agitated instead of sedated. In addition, these drugs may cause severe lethargy, incoordination, and a slowed breathing rate. In cats, some forms of benzodiazepines can cause liver failure.

Keeping Your Pet Safe

To prevent your dog or cat from getting into your medications, always keep them safely out of reach and never administer a medication to your pet without first consulting with your veterinarian.
  • Never leave loose pills in a plastic sandwich bag – the bags are too easy to chew into. Make sure all family members and guests do the same, keeping their medications out of reach.
  • If you keep your medication in a pill box or weekly pill container, make sure to store the container in a cabinet, as your dog might think it’s a plastic chew toy.
  • Never store your medications near your pet’s medications. Pet poison hotlines receive hundreds of calls every year from concerned pet owners who have inadvertently given their own medication to their pet.
  • Hang up your purse or backpack. Curious pets will explore the contents of your bag and simply placing it up out of reach solves the problem.
Remember: nearly 50 percent of all pet poisonings involve human drugs. Pets metabolize medications very differently from people. Even seemingly benign over-the-counter herbal medications, including human vitamins and mineral supplements, may cause serious poisoning in pets.
If your pet has ingested a human over-the-counter or prescription medication, please call your veterinarian, your local emergency animal hospital, or Pet Poison Helpline’s 24-hour animal poison control center at 800-213-6680 immediately.

Thursday, 26 March 2015

SNORING



SNORING ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ

DOES YOUR DOG KEEP YOU UP AT NIGHT???

SNORING THERE ARE MANY REASONS YOUR DOG MAY SNORE.

COULD ITBE, A BLOGGED NASAL PASSAGE?  THE BREATH PASSES AROUND THE BLOCKAGE IN THE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT CAUSING THE SNORE

OR OTHER FACTORS MAY BE:
 THE POSITON THE DOG IS SLEEPING IN, OBESITY CAN BE A CAUSE, DRY AIR CAN CAUSE NASAL PASSAGES TO STICK.
AGING THE CHANGING NASAL PASSAGE CAN BECOME MORE RESTRICTED.

DOGS WITH PUSHED IN FACES LIKE PUGS, BOXERS, BULL DOGS  BOSTON TERRIERS.... THESE BREEDS HAVE COMPROMISED BREATHING SO GENERALLY SNORE.

SNORING GENERALLY ISN'T A PROBLEM BUT IF YOUR DOG BREATHING IS LABOURED  AND YOU ARE CONCERNED TALK TO YOUR DOG'S VET.


Wednesday, 25 March 2015

Heartworm alternitive medication

 
Heartworm 
 
 
 
                                 
                                  www.alternativeheartwormcure.com/worms_in_dogs.html

Tuesday, 24 March 2015

WE NEED TO LOOK OUTSIDE THE BOX


 Ontario Veterinary College should teach their students both Conventional and Holistic
 Medicine.


By Dr. Nancy Scanlan, Executive Director of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Foundation
I started using nutraceuticals because I wanted to help a Boxer with heart disease. She was already on heart medicine, and after a year her heart was starting to fail again. Any increase in her regular medication would have been toxic. Nutritional supplements helped her live out her normal lifespan.
I started using acupuncture because some of my patients were in pain that was not well controlled with conventional medicine. Some of them were barely able to walk. Acupuncture got them walking and even running again.

Integrative Medicine to the Rescue

Whenever I had an unusual problem that was not helped by conventional medicine, integrative medicine came to the rescue. Those unusual cases kept increasing, as people learned that I could do things other veterinarians could not do. But many of my colleagues were doubtful. Some even recommended that my clients stop using the things I recommended. That is, until they saw some of the results.
I was not taught any of this in veterinary school. I had to take time out of a busy practice to attend special classes. Not all veterinarians are dedicated to learning a lot of extra skills that are different from anything they learned before. We have a hard enough time keeping up with all the advances that have come along since we graduated. It would have been so much easier if alternative and complementary therapies had been part of what I learned before graduation from veterinary school.

Holistic Therapies Need to Be Researched… But Funding is Hard to Find

Veterinarians use research as much as possible as a guide to which treatment protocols might be worthwhile. But it is difficult to find research funds to study herbs, or vitamin therapy, or massage therapy, or many other things that are considered “holistic.” Without that research, it’s extremely difficult to convince veterinary schools to teach about holistic treatments, or veterinarians to learn about them.
One of the goals of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Foundation is to grant funds for education and research in integrative holistic veterinary medicine. We need your help so veterinarians can learn alternative and complementary ways to help animals in trouble. Please visit AHVMF.org to donate online or to download a research application. Help give animals more options for good health!

How You Can Make a Difference

Pets bless us with their companionship and unconditional love. That’s why Mercola Healthy Pets has partnered with the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Foundation (AHVMF) to raise money for integrative education and research efforts. We were able to raise over $1 million in the last three years. Now through March 22, 2015, a portion of all sales at Healthy Pets will be donated to AHVMF. So, while you shop this week, know that each purchase will contribute to this very worthwhile cause.
Over 150 million people have pets. If just a small percentage of them donated there would be enough money raised for a trust fund that would generate the money we need for education and research. Veterinarians would come out of veterinary school with new treatments in their veterinary toolbox. Your dog will thank you for it and so will your cat, though it won’t be so obvious!
So please take a moment right now to be one in a million and make a donation to the AHVM Foundation. Come and check out our AHVMF.Org, read inspiring stories, see animal teachers, cute dog pictures, and make a donation today.

Monday, 23 March 2015

CHEW 'n DO Open House


MARCH 28TH 11:00 TO 2:00

Attention Dog Moms of the South:
We have been providing your dogs with exceptional professional dog grooming services at our full service Dog Spa since November and now we have completed renovations on the other half of our House for Hounds!!
Our full day Doggy Daycare is now OPEN!! We have worked hard to bring your dogs a top notch facility to run, rest and play with top pet professionals guiding them throughout the day. Our hours are Monday to Friday 7am - 6:30pm.
This property is completely dedicated to the dogs with triple door entry and double gated fenced in yard.
We are located in the heart of Manotick Village on Mill St.
We are having an open house next Saturday, Mar 28, from 11-2! Hope you will check us out. Call for more information! 613-692-6469
https://www.facebook.com/chewndo?ref=hl


Sunday, 22 March 2015

Ruby Tuesday

RUBY- TUESDAY


I was reminiscing about the different pets I had. My very first dog was Ruby a Golden cocker Spaniel.

Ruby had the run of the yard but I was the one in a harness tied to the clothesline. She lived till she was fourteen just shy of my fourteenth birthday. We grew up together.

Being a military brat my parents moved a lot so when we moved to Ottawa I always had a friend close by.  I don't think I could of gotten through many hurdles of life, without her comforting paws asking for more hugs and pats. She always new just what I was feeling an acted accordingly.

Its been more years, then I will admit but I still think of  her comforting nature and how she taught me how very special animals are ! A lesson that has followed me through my life.


MY BEST FRIEND

Saturday, 21 March 2015

Eye are windows to your dogs soul and.........

I think this is a truly interesting topic Iridology

The Eyes: Window to your Dog’s Health

Friday, 20 March 2015

Compassionate end

Compassionate end of life care for your pet in the comfort of their home.

The other night I was the Ottawa Kennels Club meeting. The guest speaker was Dr. Lianna Titcombe.
Dr. Titcombe is the owner of Claire Place a mobile Veterinary Service.

Animal Hospice, Palliative Care and Grief Support Network www.HospiceVet.com

I truly was moved by her stories, of the many pets that were able to go peacefully in the comfort of their own homes with the people and pets they shared their lives with, being there for them at the end.

We put Emma down in December of last year and both my husband and I were unsettled by the experience.

Emma cried out and it seemed for a number of seconds a haunting cry of pain. The euthanal was going into the vein, but also going subcutaneously.  The Vet just kept pushing on the syringe, without any adjustment and it took longer then it should have.
It is an emotion time, and a great loss to deal with losing a family member. Hagrid, the picture above is 14year old Border and definitely his time is nearer then I like to admit. We may stay home and do this better next time.

Dr. Titcombe also gave a list to consider when its time:

How much pain our pets are in?
Appetite, weight loss, struggling to get them to eat?
Hygiene, is your pet still grooming?
Mobility how mobile are they, do they still play? Or is all movement a chore?
Incontinent both urine and bowel movements
Demeanor,  Happiness vs Depressed or lethargic
Is sleep all they do?

Really it comes down to how many good days verses how many bad days your pet is having.

Its great to have this option
Thank you!


Thursday, 19 March 2015

Can Dogs Get Head Lice from Humans?


Article from Petplace.com
Written by: Dr. Debra Primovic - DVM

Head lice is a common condition that affects children, especially those in grade school, as well as some adults. They are just one of a number of similar tiny parasites that can infest the skin and hair of living things, causing an infestation called pediculosis. Animals can be susceptible to these parasites as well, and some pet parents ask me about about lice and their pets:
“Can the dog in my home get head lice from my children?”
OR
“Can my children get head lice from the dog?”
Dogs and cats do get lice, although lice are not as common as other parasites such as fleas. Lice in dogs and cats is more often associated with poor conditions including a lack of hygiene and sanitation as well as poor nutrition and overall poor health.
There are over 3,000 species of lice in the world, but a mere 3 of them are considered agents of disease in humans. The rest, however, are typically species-specific; that is, they seem to show a preference for a certain type of host. That means that some species will tend to feed only on humans, some only on cats, others only on dogs, etc. Dogs can get two types of lice, Linognathus setosus and Trichodectes canis. Cats get only one type of lice called Felicola subrostrata.
What this means is that the species which infest humans are not a risk for infesting pets and vice versa. If a child acquires a case of pediculosis, the dogs or cats in the home are not at risk of acquiring head lice.
Bear in mind that although human head lice are very contagious to other humans, they are not an indicator of poor hygiene. Treatment of head lice in humans includes various treatments to the hair, scalp, clothing, and bedding. Treating an infested pet requires similar precautions. Removal of the eggs (nits) is critical in ending the infestation.
If you suspect your child or pet has head lice, please call your health care provider or vet for treatment recommendations as soon as possible to avoid further infestations.

Monday, 16 March 2015

8 things your pets tell you LISTEN! By Dr. Becker

By Dr. Becker
“I’m sick” or “I’m in pain”
Our animal companions can’t tell us when they’re hurt or feel sick, and many types of pets, such as cats, are wired to actually hide discomfort and therefore, vulnerability.
Fortunately, there are many subtle and not-so-subtle hints our pets give us that indicate they’re not feeling well, for example, refusing to eat, drinking an excessive amount of water and urinating more frequently, getting up slowly, or limping. It’s important as your pet’s guardian to be aware of any type of physical or behavioral changes she displays, and to make an appointment with your veterinarian if the problem persists.
“I’m afraid”
This is a point of confusion for many pet parents, because animals often behave aggressively in response to fear. A behavior that looks, on the surface, like anger or belligerence is often fear-based. It’s important to know the difference, because fear must be dealt with much differently than other types of aggressive behavior. In fact, you may want to consult a veterinary behaviorist to help you determine what’s causing your pet’s behavior and how best to handle it.
“I’m mad at you”
Cats tend to get bent out of shape more often than dogs when things don’t go according to plan. In fact, any kind of disruption to your kitty’s routine or environment may bring out his crabby side.
For example, some cats act out if the cleanliness of the litterbox isn’t up to snuff, or if breakfast isn’t served at precisely 6:00 am every morning. Also, many kitties don’t appreciate a lot of petting or cuddling, and if they’re forced to endure more than they like, the claws come out.
“I need your help to lose weight”
You’ll never find an overweight, much less obese dog or cat in the wild. It’s not your pet’s nature to be fat -- he got that way thanks to his human caretakers. It’s tremendously harmful to an animal’s health to carry around excess weight.
Fat pets get the same kinds of obesity-related diseases humans do, and because dogs and cats are natural athletes designed to be very physically active, their quality of life is greatly diminished by being overweight.
“Please help me be more physically active”
Lack of exercise often goes hand-in-hand with a weight or behavior problem, but even if your pet is an ideal weight, she still needs consistent, regular, heart-thumping exercise to stay in good physical condition and mentally balanced. Many dogs develop behavior problems because they’re full of pent up energy that rarely gets released through appropriate outlets.
Kitties also need opportunities to be physically active, which can be accomplished with interactive toys, harness walks, or a safe outdoor enclosure that allows your cat to climb, jump, and prowl.
“I need to eat like a carnivore”
If your pet could talk, he’d tell you that despite what pet food companies and perhaps even your vet would like you to believe, he needs a balanced diet of whole, fresh, preferably organic foods to be optimally healthy. He’d tell you that his meals should be heavy on excellent quality animal protein and fat, with few or no grains. He’d tell you to leave all the processed stuff on the store shelf, and feed him like the carnivore he is.
“I need to explore and make friends”
Both dogs and cats need to be properly socialized at the right age to prevent them from developing fear-based behavior patterns. And your pet needs to continue to be socialized as an adult to insure the world doesn’t become a frightening place for him.
If you have a pet that wasn’t socialized as a puppy or kitten, talk with your vet or a veterinary behaviorist about the best way to approach the situation with your adult dog or cat. It’s more difficult – but not impossible – to socialize a mature pet.
“I don’t mean to misbehave”
Training is not just for dogs with behavior problems – it’s for all dogs, and it should be ongoing throughout your pet’s life. Depending on her breed or breed mix, your dog may want nothing more than to please you, or at a minimum, stay on your good side, but most dogs need structured training to learn how to be good canine citizens.
Training, including nosework, also provides mental stimulation for your dog and strengthens the bond you share with her.

Wednesday, 11 March 2015

ROAD RALLY WITH CHALLENGES

               RESTING PAWS CEMETRY &
                          CREMATORIUM

Sunday, 1 March 2015

KNOW THY DOG'S NEXT SCHEDULED CLASSES


KNOW THY DOG’S NEXT FIRST AID COURSE is Sunday  March 15TH, 22nd AND 29th  FROM 9:30 AM TO 12:30 or an evening class starting  March 24th, 31st and April 7th from 6:00 PM TO 9:00 PM


                                                            PILLOW RESTRAINT

THIS 9 HOUR COURSE ENCLUDES PRACTICAL HANDS ON FIRST AID INSTRUCTION. WE BUILD YOUR CONFIDENCE TO HELP YOU BETTER TREAT YOUR DOG. IMPROVE YOUR RELATIONS WITH YOUR DOG’S VETERINARIAN BY BEING A BETTER ADVOCATE FOR YOUR PET. LEARN AR, CPR, ON OUR CANINE CPR MANNEQUIN, CASSIE. PRACTICE CHOKING SEQUENCES AND MUCH MORE.  WE TEACH EVERYTHING FROM RECORDING YOUR DOGS VITALS, TO WOUND CARE, TO REMOVING TICKS. WE TAILOR THE COURSE TO YOUR NEEDS. AN INDEPTH REFERENCE MANUAL IS INCLUDED WITH EVERY COURSE.

CONTACT JULIA MOFFAT
knowthydog@yahoo.ca  or
call 613-697-7966